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Macromedia Dreamweaver: An Introduction

Getting started with your first web page can seem very daunting indeed. Macromedia Dreamweaver is the industry leader in web editors, but knowing where to start and what you need to know can be a little confusing at first.

If you are serious about web development, it is probably best to start off with Dreamweaver. There are other easier alternatives, such as Microsoft Frontpage which are fine for the novice web developers, but the package does lack a lot of advanced features. Once you are happy with your chose of web editor, it is then advisable to become familiar with its user environment.

Dreamweaver has what is known as a ‘What You See Is What You Get’ (WYSIWYG) environment. This means that you can easily drag and drop visually elements onto the screen. Dreamweaver 8 is the latest version and although it will look a little strange at first, you will notice that it has a similar look and feel to many other windows applications.

Now that you are familiar with the environment, you are ready to start developing…

HTML – Don’t Worry About this, Quite Yet!
What is HTML I hear you ask? HTML or Hyper Text Markup Language is the coding language used to construct web pages.

Fortunately, Dreamweaver’s WYSIWYG environment has two views for developing a web page – a design view and a coding view. Beginners often start off using the design view, which requires no HTML knowledge. Objects can be dragged and dropped onto the design view and it can be used in many ways similar to a word processor like Microsoft Word.

Once you become proficient in the design view, you can then start to use the code view where you will be required to have some knowledge of HTML. This is where the real web developing starts!

If at this stage you require more help, there are a variety of


Dreamweaver CS4

Macromedia Dreamweaver training courses based in the UK for introduction, intermediate and advanced levels to suite just about everyone’s ability – so if you want to push your Dreamweaver and HTML skills to the next level, instructor-led Dreamweaver training may be just the ticket for you!

Page Design and Layout
Before developing your page, you should be absolutely sure what it is that you want your page to do and who the intended audience is. Initially it is often wise to sketch the look of the page on a piece of paper.

You may then wish to dedicate some time to the organisation of your home page. This should include self descriptive navigational links and the content layout should be clutter free. This will allow customers to easily find what they are looking for, resulting in potentially higher sales of products and services or from a non commercial point of view, better access to your information.

Publish Your Web Page
Once you have added content to your website, you are then ready to publish it on the World Wide Web! You will require a web server to host the site, along with a web address. Both can be acquired for no or low charge on the Internet. These online hosting web sites are aimed at the first time home developers and often have large numbers of adverts.

If the website is of a commercial nature, it is advised to go with a web hosting company with a good reputation and this will involve monthly subscription fees. It is also recommended that you purchase a web site domain.

Once you have a web address to host your website and have spent some time developing the home page, you will then be ready to publish your site online!
Macromedia Dreamweaver makes publishing web pages a real breeze.

Hopefully you have found this article informative and useful. This article is not intended as a technical resource on how to use Dreamweaver, but more of a general overview of how Dreamweaver can be used and the processes involved in creating web pages.

If you require more technical assistance Macromedia has excellent self taught tutorials supplied with the product and there is also a wealth of resources online.

Get free articles in various topic for your website or blog content as much as you want at Article Directory: http://www.articlecompilation.com

Author is a Web Design and Microsoft Office trainer, for a company that is UK leader in Microsoft training. For more information on Dreamweaver, please visit www.microsofttraining.net

Adobe Education Store

Macromedia Dreamweaver Vs Microsoft FrontPage

If you are new to web design and don’t know where to start, it is probably best that you devote some time initially in selecting the most appropriate web editor. The two most popular WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) editors are Microsoft’s FrontPage and Macromedia’s Dreamweaver.

This leads to the often heated and delicate debate, “Which is the best editor?” Fortunately this article informs you of the pros and cons of both and the level of experience that is required. At this stage, I would like to make it clear that I am not an advocate for Microsoft or Macromedia and have substantial experience of using both web editors.

FrontPage Pros
Starting off with FrontPage, the latest version is 2003 and it has been built on top of the highly successful Microsoft Office suite. It benefits from having a similar appearance to Microsoft Word and many of the other Office based programs. The “non technical savv” will appreciate such a close resemblance and an easy-to-use menu system.

In fact FrontPage has many uses similar to a word processor. The functionality for inserting images, tables and formatting text are very similar. So the step-up from a well known word processor, to an equally well known web editor is not that big at all! FrontPage also has an abundance of ready to use templates, particularly useful for the novice user.

Dreamweaver Pros
Macromedia products have been designed specifically with web design in mind and Dreamweaver is the industry standard for web editors.


Dreamweaver CS4

Dreamweaver has a nice blend of advanced tools mixed in with a tasteful graphical user interface.

Dreamweaver 8, the most recent version, is part of the Macromedia Studio 8 suite. The tight integration between applications in the Studio is fantastic. Switching from Dreamweaver to another product such Fireworks, Flash and ColdFusion is an absolute “doddle” and a real time saver too!

Dreamweaver also enables you to build your own custom templates, allowing alterations to hundreds of pages to be made with one single change – great large web sites! It also has an awesome array of database utilities which makes creating dynamic pages a breeze.

Dreamweaver has an extensive collection of advanced tools and may at times be a little too complex for those who wish to merely edit pages. Fortunately, Macromedia Contribute is available and is part of the Macromedia Studio suite and enables easy website maintenance. “Non techies” can edit the content of pages, whilst the coding part of the page is protected – so no banana skins here!

FrontPage Cons
FrontPage’s simplicity and ease of use often generates lots of unwanted code which can be difficult to manage. It has been designed specifically for Internet Explorer (I.E.) and does not fully abide by the World Wide Web Standards. This means the web pages look perfect in I.E. but often slightly out of sync in other leading browsers such as Mozilla Firefox.

Another small hindrance of FrontPage is that web servers need FrontPage extensions to get some features to work.

Dreamweaver Cons
Dreamweaver is not as easy to use and may look a little foreign and intimidating to the novice user. The lack of beginner tools and usability may frustrate inexperienced users. Dreamweaver is also a little more pricey than FrontPage.
Conclusion

Dreamweaver is a professional level web editor. It has been designed to be used in a commercial environment and benefits from having advanced web design tools, is part of a great Macromedia suite, offers power database utilities and provides a wide range of e-commerce capabilities.

FrontPage on the other hand was intended for the average home user with a modest interest in web design. It is ideal for beginners and offers a range of special effects that will keep you busy for quite a while.

I think they both provide value for money and are aimed at different markets. The novice user will benefit from FrontPage, where as the professional web designer will require more advanced tools and is more likely to opt for Dreamweaver.

Get free articles in various topic for your website or blog content as much as you want at Article Directory: http://www.articlecompilation.com

Author is a trainer with a Microsoft Office training company, the UK industry leader in its sector. For more information on Dreamweaver Training, please visit www.microsofttraining.net

Adobe Education Store

Macromedia Dreamweaver Vs Microsoft FrontPage

If you are new to web design and don’t know where to start, it is probably best that you devote some time initially in selecting the most appropriate web editor. The two most popular WYSIWYG (What You See Is What You Get) editors are Microsoft’s FrontPage and Macromedia’s Dreamweaver.

This leads to the often heated and delicate debate, “Which is the best editor?” Fortunately this article informs you of the pros and cons of both and the level of experience that is required. At this stage, I would like to make it clear that I am not an advocate for Microsoft or Macromedia and have substantial experience of using both web editors.

FrontPage Pros
Starting off with FrontPage, the latest version is 2003 and it has been built on top of the highly successful Microsoft Office suite. It benefits from having a similar appearance to Microsoft Word and many of the other Office based programs. The “non technical savv” will appreciate such a close resemblance and an easy-to-use menu system.

In fact FrontPage has many uses similar to a word processor. The functionality for inserting images, tables and formatting text are very similar. So the step-up from a well known word processor, to an equally well known web editor is not that big at all! FrontPage also has an abundance of ready to use templates, particularly useful for the novice user.

Dreamweaver Pros
Macromedia products have been designed specifically with web design in mind and Dreamweaver is the industry standard for web editors. Dreamweaver has a nice blend of advanced tools mixed in with a tasteful graphical user interface.

Dreamweaver 8, the most recent version, is part of the Macromedia Studio 8 suite. The tight integration between applications in the Studio is fantastic. Switching from Dreamweaver to another product such Fireworks, Flash


Dreamweaver CS4

and ColdFusion is an absolute “doddle” and a real time saver too!

Dreamweaver also enables you to build your own custom templates, allowing alterations to hundreds of pages to be made with one single change – great large web sites! It also has an awesome array of database utilities which makes creating dynamic pages a breeze.

Dreamweaver has an extensive collection of advanced tools and may at times be a little too complex for those who wish to merely edit pages. Fortunately, Macromedia Contribute is available and is part of the Macromedia Studio suite and enables easy website maintenance. “Non techies” can edit the content of pages, whilst the coding part of the page is protected – so no banana skins here!

FrontPage Cons
FrontPage’s simplicity and ease of use often generates lots of unwanted code which can be difficult to manage. It has been designed specifically for Internet Explorer (I.E.) and does not fully abide by the World Wide Web Standards. This means the web pages look perfect in I.E. but often slightly out of sync in other leading browsers such as Mozilla Firefox.

Another small hindrance of FrontPage is that web servers need FrontPage extensions to get some features to work.

Dreamweaver Cons
Dreamweaver is not as easy to use and may look a little foreign and intimidating to the novice user. The lack of beginner tools and usability may frustrate inexperienced users. Dreamweaver is also a little more pricey than FrontPage.
Conclusion

Dreamweaver is a professional level web editor. It has been designed to be used in a commercial environment and benefits from having advanced web design tools, is part of a great Macromedia suite, offers power database utilities and provides a wide range of e-commerce capabilities.

FrontPage on the other hand was intended for the average home user with a modest interest in web design. It is ideal for beginners and offers a range of special effects that will keep you busy for quite a while.

I think they both provide value for money and are aimed at different markets. The novice user will benefit from FrontPage, where as the professional web designer will require more advanced tools and is more likely to opt for Dreamweaver.

Author is a trainer with a Microsoft Office training company, the UK industry leader in its sector. For more information on Dreamweaver Training, please visit www.microsofttraining.net

Adobe Education Store